Plight of DNB students

Respected Sir,
I have been following the current discussion on the topic of " image of ent in india" over the past couple of days. The response generated by the discussion has inspired me to put up another topic for discussion which is "Plight of DNB Otolaryngology final year students in India". This is dear to my heart as I am a final year DNB postgraduate in Otolaryngology who was due to take up my final exams in June 2010, but with the current change of regulations ( without prior notice) the exams for Otolaryngology has been postponed to December 2010.
I am from a middle economic background striving to complete my degree so that I can immediately start my practice with the hope of a better future. This unexpected delay by 6 months will cost me and my family dearly. I wonder whether the plight of the other final year DNB postgraduates in Otolaryngology is as same as mine. Sometimes I wonder if I have chosen the wrong speciality, since the respect of Otolaryngology in India is not on par with other specialities. I heard the cancellation of the exams in June was done only for the Otolaryngology and Family Medicine, It is very depressing.
I chose Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery with the foresight that it is an evolving field with potential for technical advancements and super specialization. I have also heard that a residency in Otolaryngology abroad is very difficult to get and it is one of the most sought after field, I don't understand why it is not the same here in India.
I would be much obliged if you can either post this email or start this topic for discussion so that opinions can be exchanged.
thanks
with regards
Dr. S. Kamalakannan
DNB ENT Final year student

International Workshop on Cochlear Implantation 22nd Temporal Bone Dissection Course 2nd Basic Surgical skill workshop 2, 3, 4 April 2010,MAMC, Delhi



DR J C PASSEY
course director
9868108140
room no 309
BL Taneja block
MAMC

American Association of Otolaryngologists from India in the USA

Dear Dr Kalra:

As President of AAOI (American Association of Otolaryngologists from India in the USA), I write to seek ways to strengthen our existing rapport with the AOI and hopefully to encourage and provide better communication between our two organizations. Over the past many years I have had the great fortune of interacting with a number of very talented and bright Otolaryngologists from all over India. The strident progress witnessed in India over the past decade appears to be equally reflected by this group.
Lately, our organization in the US has received much interest and supportof the AAO-HNS ( American Academy of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery). It is my hope to embark on a symbiotic and progressive relationship with AOI and also to find ways to encourage attendance at our annual meeting. As you may already know, our next meetingis scheduled to be held in Boston Massachusetts on Monday, September 27th, 2010.
I will look forward to hearing from you.
With best wishes,
Vinod K Anand, MD, FACS
501 Marshall Street,
Suite 602
Jackson, MS 39202

2nd Punjab State AOIHNS Conference April 18,2010



Steel scalpel versus electrocautery blade

J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Aug;38(4):427-33.

Steel scalpel versus electrocautery blade: comparison of cosmetic and patient satisfaction outcomes of different incision methods.

Chau JK, Dzigielewski P, Mlynarek A, Cote DW, Allen H, Harris JR, Seikaly HR.

Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.

OBJECTIVE: To determine which method of skin incision has superior cosmetic and patient satisfaction outcomes. METHODS: Consenting patients undergoing bilateral neck dissection who met the inclusion criteria were prospectively enrolled. Each side of the neck was randomly assigned into one of the following two groups: scalpel incision and electrocautery incision. Cosmetic and patient satisfaction outcomes were collected prospectively with patients and outcome assessors blinded to group assignment. Validated self-report questionnaires and objective scar measures were used. RESULTS: Nineteen patients met the criteria for inclusion. Analysis revealed no significant differences between groups in terms of cosmetic or satisfaction outcomes. Use of the steel scalpel was found to result in significantly greater incision-related blood loss compared with use of the electrocautery blade. CONCLUSION: Steel scalpel or electrocautery may be used to incise the skin of patients undergoing bilateral neck dissection with no difference in cosmetic or patient satisfaction outcome. The steel scalpel yields greater incision-related blood loss compared with the electrocautery blade.

PMID: 19755082 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Delegates from Sri Lanka at SAARC Congress,Delhi 2006

Idiopathic soft palate paralysis


Idiopathic soft palate paralysis is an isolated clinical entity of unknown cause. Typical clinical features are sudden onset rhinolalia, and nasal escape of fluids from the ipsilateral nostril. The disorder affects mainly male children at the ages of 2 to 3 years and resolves spontaneously. This picture depicts a 6-year-old male with the rare disorder. It shows right sided palatal deviation. There were no other cranial palsies and the palatal palsy recovered after administration of systemic steroids and antiviral drugs after a duration of 2 months.
--
Dr Harpreet S Kochar
MBBS (AIIMS), MS (AIIMS)
Consultant
Dept of ENT and Head Neck Surgery
Kailash Hospital (Greater Noida) and Delhi ENT hospital (Jasola, New Delhi)
India
Web: www.entgreaternoida.com
Dr.Thomas Antony said...

I had a similar case, but he was in the teens. I had posted this case for discussion in the various Orkut sites as well as entsurgeons@googlegroups.com

Conference Report:PG Teaching and Cadaveric H & N dissection workshop, AFMC, Pune

PG Teaching and Cadaveric H & N dissection workshop was held at AFMC, Pune from 25th to 27th Mar2010. Dr Ashok Shenoy, Dr Madan Kapre, Dr Prathmesh Pai, Col WVBS Ramalingam, Gp Capt Sharan Chaudhary and Col VK Shukul were the outstation faculty and the local faculty included all from ENT, MDTC, Reconstructive and Pathology fraternity at Pune. We thank all the faculty wholeheartedly for all the teaching they imparted at the wksp, leaving all their busy schedules and bearing with any inadequacies during the pgmes.

36 delegates from Maharashtra and Karnataka attended the course without any dropouts. The response was overwhelming and encouraging to the organisers. Pharma participation is erratic and whimsical and cannot be relied upon and is also not ideal. AOI and FHNO should support such activities generously. MCI, ICMR and UGC does support in a small way but it is inadequate. If support is forth coming, may be many more such workshops can be held at various places and more frequently.

With best regards to all,
PS Sukthankar
Dear Dr. Sukhtankar,

The course was well conducted. I thank you for the opportunity to be faculty in this important venture to inculcate in the post graduate trainees understanding of the cancer biology and management of common head neck tumours. I am sure such programmes will go a long way in future development of Head & Neck surgeons.

warm regards

Prathamesh S. Pai,
MS(ENT), DNB, DORL, MNAMS
Associate Professor & Surgeon
Dept of Head & Neck Surgical Oncology
Tata Memorial Hospital
Mumbai 400 012
India

Images:Kentcon Thrissur 2009



VIEW ALBUM

AOI Archives 2000: Malnad Branch

The Malnad Branch of A O I conducted a Deafn~s Relief Sur-gery Camp with the help of Rotary Club, Shimoga Central.They conducted screening camps at 5 Taluk places and se-surgeons viz :- Dr. N. D. Purushottam, (Bangalore), Dr.Nalinesh, (Bangalore), Dr. Shankar Medikeri (Bangalore),Dr. H. Vijayendra(Bangalore) conducted the surgery at Dis-trict Mc. Gann Hospital Shimoga on 1st & 2nd July 2000.Stapedectomy, Myringoplasty and Cholesteatoma Surgery was carried out in the patients. The sessions were attended by 20 ENT surgeons' in and around Shimoga.
Main beneficiaries were the poor and destitude patients. On the evening of 01-07-2000, a CME was arranged on which Dr. N. D. Purushottam spoke on Micro-Laryngeal Surgery, Dr.Vijayendra on Facial Nerve Surgery, Dr. S. Medikeri on Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

Improving Image of ENT in India,Dr. V. Aravinthan MS

Dr. V. Aravinthan MS DNB(ENT)
Associate Professor of ENT
Coimbatore Medical College
I Iike to share my comments on why ENT is not in the top preferred by medicos.Being the lowest clinical branch 25 years back it has climbed up few fields but still it is not in the top bracket. On the feedback by my old students and from my personal assessment I attribute the following also as contributing reasons.
a. Difficulty in understanding the complex anatomy of ENT. Not much importance is or focus is given during the anatomy posting.(How far even postgraduates are thorough is another debatable question)
b. During the ENT posting they are taught more theoretically.The students find difficult to diagnose clinical conditions on their own because of the limitations of the bull's eye lamp or head light. Thould should be encouraged to use otoscopes more under supervision and frequently showed of diagnostic nasal endoscopies and videolaryngoscopies. Many of the ENT conditions are imaginative for them.
c. During the period of internship they are poisted only for 15 days. By the time they get a feel of what is what in ENT they complete the posting. In contrary where they stay for one to three months in Surgery/Medicine they develop interest.
Even during the internship posting their first attempt to clean the ear or do indirect laryngoscopy often ends futile.Pt's scream or cough on their face creates a negative impression.
The period during which students get familiarised with ENT doesnt make an impact or fascinating impression in them to take up the field in future. The teachers in the medical colleges has to rise up to the occassion to make our field of top choice in future

Image of ENT in India: Dr Abha Bhatnagar

To improve the image of ENT at undergraduate level one has to improve the megapixels means the need to be widely exposed.This is comparable to Bollywood films vs theatre.
A good audiovisual exposure gives a mass apeal to a group of 150 students which can motivate them.actually speaking ENT itselfis a superspecialised branch of general surgery which need rigorous training like a theatre with limited audiance.Medical side of ENT problem(30-40%) is largely taken care by MBBS and we are well aware of their knoweledge,so the PG aspirants are not able to think beyond that.Whosoever falls in this stream never regreats rather enjoyes to its fullest as the time passes by.
Abha Bhatnagar
ENT Specialist Delhi

Images: AOICON 2010 Mumbai -Fashion Show

Whats your opinion on format of Otolayngology training at MBBS level?


  • Teaching Basics only
  • Teaching Exhaustive syllabus
  • Does not matter much
VOTE AT
www.entinda.net

Blogger Dr. Rohit Sharma said...

I think that the poll question is a bit ambiguous. Its not clear whether it has been asked about the current format or what an ideal format should be?

Dr. Rohit Sharma
Associate Prof.
Dept., of ENT
SRMSIMS
Bareilly

March 28, 2010 9:56 AM

Delete
Blogger ENT SPECIALIST said...

WHO IS BOTHERED TO ATTEND ENT POSTING .SO WHERE LIES THE THE USE OF ASKING SUCH A QUESTION.

March 29, 2010 10:43 AM

Delete
Blogger kamal said...

Respected Sir,
I have been following the current discussion on the topic of " image of ent in india" over the past couple of days. The response generated by the discussion has inspired me to put up another topic for discussion which is "Plight of DNB Otolaryngology final year students in India". This is dear to my heart as I am a final year DNB postgraduate in Otolaryngology who was due to take up my final exams in June 2010, but with the current change of regulations ( without prior notice) the exams for Otolaryngology has been postponed to December 2010.

I am from a middle economic background striving to complete my degree so that I can immediately start my practice with the hope of a better future. This unexpected delay by 6 months will cost me and my family dearly. I wonder whether the plight of the other final year DNB postgraduates in Otolaryngology is as same as mine. Sometimes I wonder if I have chosen the wrong speciality, since the respect of Otolaryngology in India is not on par with other specialities. I heard the cancellation of the exams in June was done only for the Otolaryngology and Family Medicine, It is very depressing.

I chose Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery with the foresight that it is an evolving field with potential for technical advancements and super specialization. I have also heard that a residency in Otolaryngology abroad is very difficult to get and it is one of the most sought after field, I don't understand why it is not the same here in India.

I would be much obliged if you can either post this email or start this topic for discussion so that opinions can be exchanged.

thanks

with regards

Dr. S. Kamalakannan
DNB ENT Final year student

March 30, 2010 1:20 AM

Delete
Blogger arjun said...

sir, in my opinion, UG student should have an idea about all d topics in ENT & HEAD AND NECK SURGERY along with some topics in detail.
but he should know what all the topics ENT is covering.
it should not be so easy coz at present the normal thinking in undergraduate mind is that he can finish ENT in 1 month period, nothing 2 read in ENT.

March 30, 2010 5:03 PM

Delete

Dr RUSTOM A. F. COOPER,1903-1975


As one of the pivotal founder member of the Association of otolaryngologists
of India he was a devoted member and served as secretary for ten years and as a Treasurer. In 1958 he became president of the Association and laterwas honoured as an Honorary member of the Bombay branch of the AOI. The Association continues to honour him today through the annual Dr. R.A.F. Cooper award which is given to young
E.N.T. surgeons for original work done in the field.
READ MORE>>>

Image of ENT in India:Dr NN Mathur

While I do agree with the broad observation of Dr Agarwal, I do have reservations on the 'curriculum' aspect of it.

There are two things:
1. Sensitizing the students to the different diseases which can be treated by ENT
2. Including everything into curriculum to be taught by ENT Professor

Now I do feel that the first point is important and it is the duty of all ENT Professors to sensitize students to the dimensions of ENT. The best way that it can be done is to make them come to ENT operation room during their posting. But this has limitations as the number of students are too many and they can at the most come to theatre 2-3 times in their entire posting and see for the maximum 2-3 types of surgery being done on that particular day. We can also use our recordings to be shown to them. But still it is important for them to come to theatre, as I feel that has the maximum 'impressionable factor'. The method of sensitizing them to ENT to the point that they start liking ENT is for them to be taught by real good 'teachers' in the clinics who can demonstrate to them all dimensions of the specialty and the disease patterns. I am of the opinion that ENT teachers in India need to improve their academic image. We are too poilitical. This is my personal opinion and this is not against any individual as I am as much part of this.

Regarding point number 2, I feel it is not necessary that only ENT has to teach the topics suggested by Dr Agarwal. The curriculum should include all the topics suggested but need not be addressed by ENT only during lectures. Also I firmly believe that there should be no repetition in Curriculum- theory lectures/ seminars. Things once taught properly should not be taught again by another individual or department as it has no use and only generates conflicts in the mind of students. Moreover now the curriculum is so vast that there is hardly any time to repeat.


Dr Neeraj N Mathur
Professor
Deptt of ENT and Head Neck Surgery
Vardhman Mahavir Medical College and Safdarjung Hospital
New Delhi 110029

Improve the image of ENT in india:Dr Anoop agarwal

Sir,
I would like 2 say that in our country,the image of ENT is not good. It is considered as lowest clinical branch even among medicos ,while as u know in western countries it is one of the top most branch. i think the reason behind this is our undergraduate teaching. students dont wat all d things comes in ENT. they think ENT means mastoid/septo/tonsils and max 2 max fess. Our teachers r not teaching us real ENT for example-

1.submandibular gland
2.parotid gland
3.thyroid gland
4.mandible and maxillary fracture
5.carotid artery
6.various vascular tumours
7.headache, migrain
8.various neuralgias
9.cleft palate and lip
10.various types of flaps and graft in head and neck area
11.epulis,dentigerous cyst etc
12.sistrunk
13.branhial cyst and fistula and other neck swellings
14.postcricoid carcinoma and other oesophagus diseases
15.all cranial nerves
16.basic knowledge of skull base
17.temporal bone anatomy
18. many more

these r d topics we used 2 read in detail in general surgery and medicine. while they should b taught in detail in ENT. so that student sud know d field of ENT. then only they will consider ENT as a gud subject. the general thinking among UG students is that ENT is the subject of 1 month,so no need 2 study for whole ear. even postgraduate of other branches also having this idea about ENT. they dont know wat all d things ENT surgeons r doing in other countries and in south india.
my humble request to all ENT teachers is ,plz plz plz teach all d things in ENT proff at undergraduate level itself, so that image of this tough subject will improve.

sir kindly tell my request to max professors in various medical colleges, they should start it from 2morrow.

thanking you

with regards
Dr Anoop agarwal
Thank u very much sir for raising d issue nicely.
I have seen so many suggestions on our ENT update site, all r very gud. like -
1) lack of proper teaching
2) lack of interest in student and teacher both
3) less exposure coz of no video etc
4) less days posting in internship
5) no idea among UGs about How vast d ENT is
6) medical clg professors r busy in politics rather than academics

sir, i want 2 add some more.

Responsibility of image improving of ENT is on youngesters( residents and consultants both) . We have 2 come forward. ENT deptt should b d role model for undergraduates. At basic level i.e at UG level we have 2 do lot of changes. all "mehnat"(infact responsibility) done by our medical college professors is for their own respect.

Dr Anoop Agarwal

Images: 1st French-Indian ENT Meeting, held on Tuesday, March 22, at the LALIT,Delhi


The French Delegation was felicitated by Delhi AOI President Dr Anil Monga & Secretary Dr Alok Agarwal.

AOICON 2011,The Faculty


Prof. Gerard O'Donoghue, Professor of Otolaryngology, Nottingham University, UK.

Prof. Thomas Roland, Professor of Otolaryngology & Chairman, Dept. of Otology, Newyork University school of medicine.

Prof. Joachim Muller, Professor of Otolaryngology, University of Wurzberg, Germany.

Prof. Lokmann Saim, Dean, Faculty of Medicine & Chairman, Dept. of Otolaryngology, National University of Malaysia, Kula Lumpur.

Prof. Manohar Bance, Chairman & Professor of Dept. of Otolaryngology & Bio-engineering, University of Halifax, Dalhousie, Canada.

Dr. John Mathews, Consultant Otolaryngologist, UK.

Dr. Peter Catalano – Rhinologist & Otologist, USA.

Prof. Andreas Leunig, Professor (APL) at the Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich.

Dr. Nikhil Bhat.

Dr. Krishna Reddy. Consultant ENT Surgeon, North Cheshire Hospitals, Member of AAC Royal College of Surgeons England.

Dr. Emad Massoud, Professor and Program Director in the Department of Otolaryngology at Dalhousie University.

Dr. Joseph Paydarfar, Assistant Professor of Surgery – Otolaryngology,Dartmouth Medical School,Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center,Lebanon, NH.
Dr. Regan Thomas

Dr. Ashutosh Kacker, Consultant Otolaryngologist, New York

Dr. Sivakumar Annamalai, Consultant Otolaryngologist, Toronto.

Dr. Mazen Alkhobari, Senior otolaryngologist, Professor & Chairman Sultan of Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman.

Dr. David Kennedy, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Deepak Rajender Kumar, Consultant AudioVestibular Medicine, University Hospital, Cardiff, United Kingdom

Drooling:eMedicine article by Prof NN Mathur

Drooling is the unintentional loss of saliva from the mouth. The term drooling commonly refers to anterior drooling and should be distinguished from posterior drooling, in which saliva spills over the tongue through the faucial isthmus. Drooling is a significant disability for a large number of pediatric and adult patients with cerebral palsy and for a smaller number of patients with other types of neurologic or cognitive impairment.

Drooling is a normal phenomenon in children prior to the development of oral neuromuscular control at age 18-24 months. However, drooling after age 4 years is uniformly considered abnormal. Children with neurologic impairment may be slow to mature their oral neuromuscular control and may continue to improve their control until approximately age 6 years, which prompts physicians to delay any aggressive intervention until that time. READ MORE>>>
Author:Prof at SJ Hospital & asso.VMMC,Delhi
Formerly: Neeraj N Mathur, MBBS, MS, Professor, Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Lady Hardinge Medical College and Associated Smt SK and Kalawati, Saran Children's Hospital, University of Delhi, India; Professor and Head, Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Nepal

Flower of Day


Location: Ooty,Botanical Garden(Tamil Nadu)

AOI oration in memory of Prof. Y.N. Mehra


Prof. Y.N. Mehra : Former Dean & Professor Emeritus retired from PGI after a distinguished career spanning for more than 30 years. He established the Department of Otolaryngology at PGI, Chandigarh in 1961
Professor Mehra was a man of unflinching integrity and utmost dedication.He was good surgeon and had a great command of surgical anatomy.
Congratulations to PGI ENT alumni for starting an Oration in the name of Prof. Y.N. Mehra

PROF. C. R. SUNDARARAJAN NATIONAL PLASTIC SURGERY CME 16th -17th April, 2010 Goa Medical College, Bambolim.




Registration Form
Programme

Absract:Intratympanic gentamicin treatment of patients with Ménière's disease with normal hearing.

Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2010 Apr;142(4):570-575.
Intratympanic gentamicin treatment of patients with Ménière's disease with normal hearing.
Silverstein H, Wazen J, Van Ess MJ, Daugherty J, Alameda YA.

Ear Research Foundation, a division of the Silverstein Institute, Sarasota, FL.
OBJECTIVE: Understand the safety and outcomes of intratympanic gentamicin treatment in patients with Ménière's disease with normal hearing. STUDY DESIGN: Case series with chart review. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 224 patients with disabling Ménière's disease treated between May 1996 and June 2007 were grouped according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS) 1995 Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium staging guidelines: stage 1 (<25 dB pure-tone average [PTA]); stage 2 through 4 (>25 dB PTA). Patients underwent self-treatment with intratympanic gentamicin (10 mg/mL) three times daily for one to eight weeks. Outcome measures included pre- and post-treatment speech discrimination score (SDS), PTA, electronystagmography, vertigo relief, and statistical analysis utilizing the Pearson chi(2) test. RESULTS: Twenty-two (88%) of 24 patients with stage 1 Ménière's disease showed unchanged or improved SDS. All 24 patients showed a mean PTA loss of 8 dB. Seventeen (71%) patients reported complete or improved vertigo control. One hundred sixteen (59%) of 200 patients with stage 2 through 4 Ménière's disease showed unchanged or improved SDS. All 200 patients showed a mean PTA loss of 11 dB. One hundred forty-eight (74%) patients reported complete or improved vertigo control. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with stage 1 Ménière's disease appear to have similar vertigo control with better hearing preservation than patients with advanced disease when treated with low-dose intratympanic gentamicin (10 mg/mL). Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID: 20304280 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

AOICON 2010,Mumbai Images


CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE
You can send us photos of AOICON 2010 from your collection

Flower of Day

Department of Otolayngology,PGI Chandigarh


Department Website

Uttaranchal AOI State Conference, April 24-25,Rishikesh


Archives:AOl— JALANDHAR BRANCH.1995

AOl— JALANDHAR BRANCH
Otology update-1995 was held in Verma
Hospital, Jalandhar on 18-19th November 1995,
hosted by the Jalandhar E.N.T. Forum.
Dr. R.C. Deka (AIIMS), Dr. S.C. Mishra
(Lucknow), Dr. A. Mahadeviaha (Bangalore), Dr.
Prabodh Karnik (Mumbai) and Dr. M.L. Sharma
(Shimla) participated as faculty. Temporal Bone
dissection and Live Microsurgery of the ear were
demonstrated on CCTV and two way talk back
system. 40 delegates attended this two day
workshop.
Dr. Ravinder Verma was the organizing
secreatary.

1st French - Indian ENT Meeting / Program

Dear Doctor,
Thank you very much for your response. The French ENT Society would be delighted to welcome you to participate at the 1st French-Indian ENT Meeting, to be held on Tuesday, March 22, at the LALIT Hotel in New Delhi starting at 8 am, and on Friday, March 26, at the ITC RAJPUTAN SHERATON Hotel in Jaipur, starting at 8 am.

Thank you!

Sincerely
Professor Frederic Chabolle
General Secretary French National ENT Society

Programme (Click Image to View)



Regarding the registration fee for an Indian Physician :The price for the 2 Must session (one in Dehli, One in Jaipur ) is 50 USD = 2318 INR. The price included congress registration, badges, scientific congress, Break, documents diffused, and certificate of attendance.
Not meal, not transport, not accommodation….
Conference fee can be paid on spot in Indian Rupees on Spot
(Organizers)

Flower of Day


Appeal:
Readers are requested to send their websites Link to us for other Readers benefit:
1.State and City Associations of ENT
2.ENT Departments of Medical Colleges
3.ENT Hospital
4.ENT Deparments of Private Corporate/Non-Corporate Hospital
5.Blogs by ENT Surgeons
5.Individual ENT Websites.
If you wish we can create a Web Link for you by data made available to us.
Best Regards
Dr Rajesh Kalra
E mail:update@entindia.net

Poll:Is ENT still considered a lower clinical Branch amongst Medicos?



Is ENT still considered a lower clinical Branch amongst Medicos?

Vote at www.entindia.net

Spare a thought for House Sparrow



What you can do

Sprinkle grain on the verandah/terrace of your house.
If you have even a little space around your house, try to make a home/kitchen garden.
Feed platforms might help the welcome birds back.
Clean water can be kept.
Pots with straw can be hung as nesting sites.
Lead environmentally healthy lives so that birds too can survive.
Say no to pesticides in your homes. Use organic repellents.

>CLICK HERE

A Sword Swallower

AOICON 2011,Chennai


Dear Colleagues,
Warm Greetings from Chennai.
It is with great pleasure that we invite you to the AOICON 2011 being held in Chennai. Theme: “The Inner Ear & Beyond”
This conference will bring together an eminent “Star Studded” Galaxy of internationally acclaimed experts in various disciplines of Otorhinolaryngology. The conference is being conducted in one of the best venues in the country.
The organizers are taking all efforts to ensure that you have a memorable time.
We welcome you to experience the tradition of hospitality deeply ingrained in every Chennaiite.
Vanakkam
Organizing Chairman
Prof. Mohan Kameswaran
Organizing Secretary
Prof. Jacinth Cornelius
Organizing Treasurer
Dr. R. S. Anand Kumar
Joint Secretaries
Dr. K. Karthikeyan
Dr. P. Vijaya Krishnan
Dr. S. Raghunandhan
Dr. S. Sudhamaheswari

Contact us
Conference Secretariat:
Madras ENT Research Foundation (P) Ltd
No. 1, I Cross Street, Off. II Main Road, Raja Annamalai Puram,
Chennai - 600 028, Tamil Nadu, India.
Phone No : 044 - 2431 1411 / 1412 / 1413 / 1414 / 1415 Fax : 044 - 2431 1416
Mobile : +91 91766 40288
aoicon2011@yahoo.com
Click here to visit the website

AOI Archives:1995 Gujrat State Branch

AIO--GUJARAT STATE BRANCH
The XIX Annual Conference of Gujarat State,
Branch was held at Mt. Abu (Rajasthan) on 9-10th Dec. '95.
Dr. Janardan Rao of Apollo Hospital,Hyderabad delivered a guest lecture on "Cochlear
Implant".
Workshop was organised on 9th Dec.,preceding the conference, on "Laryngectomy and
TEP reconstruction" in which Dr. Ashok Metha from Tata Memorial Hosp., Bombay participated.In C.M.E., Dr. Dipak Parekh from Tata Memorial Hosp., Bombay spoke on "Laser Surgery for Laryngeal disorders".Dr. Ranade from Ahmedabad delivered "Dr.
Balge Oration Lecture" on "Transseptal Hypophysectomy".
Following are the office bearers of the Gujarat
State Branch for the year 1996:
President: Dr. Vinod Pandya (Rajkot)
Hon. Secretary : Dr. Archana Desai (Baroda)
Hon. Treasurer: Dr. Anupam Desai.(Mumbai)
Workshop on "FESS and Rhinoplasty" was arranged at Mehsana, North Gujarat, on 30-31st
Dec., 1995 by Dr. Kaluskar from Ireland.

Surgery of sinus tympani cholesteatoma: Endoscopic necessity

Int. Adv. Otol. 2009; 5:(2)

Surgery of sinus tympani cholesteatoma: Endoscopic necessity
Mohamed M.K. Badr-El-Dine
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Alexandria School of Medicine, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, EGYPT. mbeldine@yahoo.com

Objective: Residual cholesteatoma occurs as a consequence of growth of a fragmental remnant of the matrix inadvertently left behind at the time of primary surgery. Poor access is the major reason for residual disease, particularly in the sinus tympani (ST). The ST is a critical anatomic region considered the most hidden recess of the middle ear. The aim of our study was to highlight the importance of extension of cholesteatoma into the ST and to demonstrate the efficacy of oto-endoscopy allowing direct access to eradicate disease from this potentially dangerous site.
Materials and Methods: A total of 294 ears with acquired cholesteatoma (primary or secondary) were operated on. In this study, 212 cases were operated upon using canal wall up (CWU) technique, and 82 cases were operated upon using canal wall down (CWD) procedure. Oto-endoscopy was incorporated complementary to the microscope as a principal part of the procedure in all cases. Second-look endoscopic exploration was performed on some selected cases, depending on the operative details during the primary surgery and the postoperative findings of clinical and radiologic studies.
Results: In the primary surgery after completion of microscopic cleaning, the overall incidence of intraoperative residuals detected with the endoscope was (49 cases) 16.7%. Sinus tympani was the most common site of intraoperative residuals in both CWU and CWD groups (36.7%), followed by the facial recess (28.6%), and the undersurface of the scutum in the CWU cases (20.4%); and the anterior epitympanic recess (14.3%). Reconstruction of the hearing mechanism was performed during the primary surgery in 246 cases (83.7%) and postponed to the second stage in only 48 cases (16.3%). Out of the 212 CWU cases, 93 second-look endoscopic explorations (43.9%) were performed. Eight recurrences (8.6%) were identified: 5 cases showed one or more recurrent cholesteatoma pearls, and 3 cases showed a larger open cholesteatoma recurrence extending to the aditus and mastoid. In this series, no morbidity or complication was encountered secondary to the use of endoscopes in the mastoid or middle ear.
Conclusion: From our experience in endoscopic ear surgery we have come to the conclusion that the ability of endoscopes to peer into the recesses of middle ear and mastoid cavity proved without doubt its usefulness. The use of endoscope achieved significant higher degree of control over the disease and dramatically reduced the incidence of cholesteatoma recurrence particularly in those hidden recesses such as the sinus tympani.

Flower of the Day

Hairy polyp of the oronasopharynx

Hairy polyp of the oropharynx: case report and literature review.J Pediatr Surg. 1996 May;31(5):704-6.

Hairy polyp of the oronasopharynx is an uncommon developmental malformation that is most frequently seen as a pedunculated tumor in the neonate. Derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm, this benign tumor generally has been classified as dermoid. The clinical presentation is dependent on the polyp's size and location. A full-term girl was evaluated for an oral mass that was first noted at the time of birth. Evaluation showed a 5- x 2.5-cm soft, nontender, skin-covered mass that protruded from the oral cavity. During surgery, it was noted that the stalk was attached to the superior pole of the left tonsil. The histology of the mass was consistent with a hairy polyp. Knowledge of this type of malformation facilitates early intervention and avoids significant morbidity.
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Pic of the Day


This is the sunset at the North Pole with the moon at its closest point.
Sent by Dr Sanjay Manthale(Mumbai)

2ND ADELAIDE ENDOSCOPIC SKULL BASE COURSE ,15th – 17th JULY 2010



2nd Adelaide Endosocpic Skull Base Surgery Course

We are extremely fortunate to have the world leaders in endoscopic skull base surgery as our guests of honour at this course. Amin Kassam and Ricardo Carrau
formally from the University of Pittsburgh and now from the John Wayne Cancer Institute have built a reputation as the world leaders in this field and we are privileged to have them share their knowledge. Their expertise is complimented by a very experienced local faculty of ENT and neurosurgeons. This course provides the opportunity for ENT and Neurosurgeons to improve their endoscopic skills and to learn the endoscopic anatomy of the nasal cavity and sinuses through which the posterior cranial fossa, pituitary gland and anterior cranial fossa can be approached. Ideally the neurosurgeon and ENT surgeon would register as a team, allowing the extensive sinus surgery required as part of the approach to be rapidly performed by the ENT surgeon leaving more time for dissection of the posterior fossa, anterior fossa and infra-temporal fossa. Emphasis on this course is hands-on dissection providing the opportunity for learning how to position and management of instruments in the nose, sinuses and intra-cranial cavity and to understand the
endoscopic anatomy involved in such approaches. This will be a very intensive, but hopefully enriching three-day course.

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Prof P.J. Wormald
Chairman & Head Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005
Ph : +61 8 8222 7158
Fax : +61 8 8222 7419
e-mail: peterj.wormald@adelaide.edu.au

Adelaide Endoscopic Management of Vascular Injuries Workshop 14th JULY 2010

Adelaide Endoscopic Management of Vascular
Injuries Workshop
We are extremely fortunate to have the world leaders in endoscopic skull base surgery as our guests of honour at this course. Amin Kassam and Ricardo Carrau formally from the University of Pittsburgh and now from the John Wayne Cancer Institute have built a reputation as the world leaders in this field and we are privileged to have them share their knowledge. Their expertise is complimented by a very experienced local faculty of ENT and neurosurgeons. The most dramatic complication in endonasal surgery is inadvertent injury to the ICA causing massive bleeding which is often fatal. This course provides the unique opportunity for ENT and Neurosurgeons toimprove their endoscopic skills in surgically managing this challenging complication,and to become familiar with the haemostatic options available. Ideally the neurosurgeon and ENT surgeon would register as a team, allowing the team to develop the skills together in a cooperative fashion. Emphasis on this course is hands-on dissection providing the opportunity to learn how to position and manage the instruments during such a challenging surgical field, and enabling vascular control. This will be a very intensive, but hopefully enriching course.
Prof P.J. Wormald
Chairman & Head Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
The University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIA 5005
Ph : +61 8 8222 7158
Fax : +61 8 8222 7419
e-mail: peterj.wormald@adelaide.edu.au
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Job Vacancy in Trichy


DR JANAKIRAM FROM TRICHY. I WOULD LIKE TO ANNOUCE THAT WE HAVE VACANCIES FOR 5 RESIDENT POSTS ( ONE YEAR ) AT OUR CENTRE. WE WILL PAY THEM RS 20,000 / - TO 30,000 /- PER MONTH WITH FREE ACCOMODATION.
CONTACT NUMBER : 09842461176
WORK PLACE : TRICHY , TAMILNADU


THANK YOU
DR JANAKIRAM

Conference Report: Excellence in Rhinoplasty:Organised by the Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology of the University Hospital Leuven,Belgium


Report by Dr Lionel Azan (rhinoplasty surgeon Paris )
READ CONFERENCE REPORT
The report includes various useful tips for Rhinoplasty Surgeons

Flower of the Day



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